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Twitter Claims Video of Moon Rocket Launch Is Revenge Porn


Not THAT kind of rocket, you pervs.

Nice Rocket

Revenge porn is a horrible thing, and Twitter should definitely continue to ban anyone who attempts to post it on the app. That being said, a video of a rocket taking off — an actual rocket, you pervs — does not revenge porn make, and shouldn’t be flagged as such.

It seems like a silly thing to have to say, but such is the exact situation that spaceflight photographer John Kraus found himself in earlier this week. Kraus, who was on site to photograph the historic Artemis I launch, took to Twitter to post a mesmerizing video of the liftoff — only to find himself kicked off of the app shortly thereafter, due to the fact that his post, for whatever inexplicable reason, had been marked as revenge porn.

I’d like to acknowledge that our good friend and rocket photography extraordinaire, [John Kraus], has been completely locked out of twitter since yesterday, for an arbitrary and silly reason, the day of the biggest launch of his career,” read an angry tweet from the Tim “Everyday Astronaut” Dodd. “Worst possible timing.”

Let Freedom Ring

Twitter finally let Kraus back online today. But for a rocket photographer, getting kicked off of Twitter on the day of the Artemis I launch really is a nightmare scenario.

“Almost two days later, I’m back. Twitter just acknowledged that they falsely locked my account instantly after I posted a benign video/caption of the Artemis I launch,” he tweeted upon his return. “This was an unfortunate error after one of the biggest launches of my career.”

While there was some speculation that new Twitter owner Elon Musk — who fired waves of employees, then effectively forced a mass exodus of quitters, and has reportedly been begging employees to come back so the ship that is Twitter doesn’t fully sink beneath the digital waves — was to blame for Kraus’ unfortunately-timed ban, given the chaos that’s ensued on the tech side since Musk’s takeover. Kraus, however, denied that Musk had anything to do with it.

“Anyone speculating it had to do with [Elon Musk] / new Twitter policy / not wanting NASA content instead of SpaceX, or that it was an ITAR violation — you are WRONG,” he clarified. “It was falsely auto-flagged by software/AI.”

So, maybe not Musk’s fault, but a screwup that now falls directly on his presumably still-full plate. Anyway. We’re glad that Kraus is free. And, for the record, here’s the video that led to the whole debacle:

More on Artemis I: Experts Baffled by Why Nasa’s “Red Crew” Wear Blue Shirts





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